Erectile Dysfunction Statistic

April 12, 2016 - 2 minutes read

Erectile dysfunction, or ED, is the most common sex problem that men report to their doctor. It affects as many as 30 million men. 40% of men over age sixty will experience some kind of erectile dysfunction in their lifetimes.

This statistic makes treating and preventing erectable disorder one of the most urgent health needs of an aging population (which is just one reason why improving the science of male sexual function is so vital to the health of our world) Unfortunately an estimated one third of all cases of impotence are caused by vascular disease in the blood vessels supplying the penis – a condition called arthritogenic insufficiency 80 percent of these can be treated with L-arginine therapy making it by far the most effective treatment for erection problems available in the world in the past ten years and increasing chitosan’s usefulness as an acute-healing agent due to its ability to increase blood flow by a factor up to twelve times normal 95 percent report increase in blood supply and forty seven reported increases in rigidity,.

Traditional treatment of heart attacks using aspirin can cause decreased blood flow to the erection 70 per cent of patients reported that their sex life was improved after taking a supplement containing glucosamine for one year In a study of patients with clogged arteries of the lower extremities who also received either the amino acid tryptophan or the sleep hormone 5 hydroxytryptophan for three months there was a reduction in arterial stiffness “good” plaque The rate at which such plaques form can make the difference between a man living a long and prosperous life versus 10 years to suffering from a heart attack that will cause him to never recover Rarely are the male organs compromised in such a dramatic way until so late in life — often until late middle age when vascular disease is “accruing” in the form of hardening of structures such as arterioles of the heart and liver caused by lack of the normal repair enzymes to replace damaged LDL cholesterol molecules in the body Few medications remain in the market for decades without major changes occurring usually in response to new side effects discovered.